Virtual ChemLab
Frequently Asked Questions

 

 

 

 

 

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Q: What is Virtual ChemLab?

 

Virtual ChemLab is a set of realistic and sophisticated simulations covering general and organic chemistry laboratories. In these laboratories, students are put into a virtual environment where they are free to make the choices and decisions that they would confront in an actual laboratory setting and, in turn, experience the resulting consequences.

 

 

 

These laboratories include simulations of:

 

 

 

The general purpose of these laboratories is to:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Q: What labs are included within Virtual ChemLab?

 

General Chemistry v2.5                   

An easy-to-use simulation of five different general chemistry laboratories. These labs include:

 

Inorganic Qualitative Analysis

The features of the inorganic simulation include:

 

·        26 cations that can be added to test tubes in any combination;

·        11 reagents that can be added to the test tubes in any sequence and any number of times, necessary laboratory manipulations;

·        a lab book for recording results and observations;

·        a stockroom for creating test tubes with known mixtures, generating practice unknowns, or retrieving instructor assigned unknowns.

 

The simulation uses over 2500 actual pictures to show the results of reactions and over 220 videos to show the different flame tests. With 26 cations that can be combined in any order or combination and 11 reagents that can be added in any order, there are in excess of 1016 possible outcomes in the simulation.

 

Fundamental Experiments in Quantum Chemistry

The purpose of the quantum laboratory is to allow students to explore and better understand the foundational experiments that led to the development of quantum mechanics. Because of the very sophisticated nature of most of these experiments, the quantum laboratory is the most “virtual” of the Virtual ChemLab laboratory simulations.

 

In general, the laboratory consists of an optics table where a source, sample, modifier, and detector combination can be placed to perform different experiments.

 

These devices are located in the stockroom and can be taken out of the stockroom and placed in various locations on the optics table. The emphasis here is to teach students to probe a sample (e.g., a gas, metal foil, two-slit screen, etc.) with a source (e.g., a laser, electron gun, alpha-particle source, etc.) and detect the outcome with a specific detector (e.g., a phosphor screen, spectrometer, etc.). Heat, electric fields, or magnetic fields can also be applied to modify an aspect of the experiment. As in all Virtual ChemLab laboratories, the focus is to allow students the ability to explore and discover, in a safe and level-appropriate setting, the concepts that are important in the various areas of chemistry.

 

Gas Properties

The gas experiments included in the Virtual ChemLab simulated laboratory allow students to explore and better understand the behavior of ideal gases, real gases, and van der Waals gases (a model real gas).

 

The gases laboratory contains four experiments each of which includes the four variables used to describe a gas: pressure (P), temperature (T), volume (V), and the number of moles (n).

 

The four experiments differ by allowing one of these variables to be the dependent variable while the others are independent. The four experiments include:

 

·        V as a function of P, T, and n using a balloon to reflect the volume changes;

·        P as a function of V, T, and n using a motor driven piston;

·        T as a function of P, V, and n again using a motor driven piston;

·        V as a function of P, T, and n but this time using a frictionless, massless piston to reflect volume changes and using weights to apply pressure.

 

The gases that can be used in these experiments include an ideal gas; a van der Waals gas whose parameters can be changed to represent any real gas; real gases including N2, CO2, CH4, H2O, NH3, and He; and eight ideal gases with different molecular weights that can be added to the experiments to form gas mixtures.

 

Titration Experiments

The virtual titration laboratory allows students to perform precise, quantitative titrations involving acid-base and electrochemical reactions. The available laboratory equipment consists of a 50 mL buret, 5, 10, and 25 mL pipets, graduated cylinders, beakers, a stir plate, a set of 8 acid-base indicators, a pH meter/voltmeter, a conductivity meter, and an analytical balance for weighing out solids.

 

Acid-base titrations can be performed on any combination of mono-, di-, and tri-protic acids and mono-, di-, and tri-basic bases. The pH of these titrations can be monitored using a pH meter, an indicator, and a conductivity meter as a function of volume, and this data can be saved to an electronic lab book for later analysis. A smaller set of potentiometric titrations can also be performed.

 

Systematic and random errors in the mass and volume measurements have been included in the simulation by introducing buoyancy errors in the mass weighings, volumetric errors in the glassware, and characteristic systematic and random errors in the pH/voltmeter and conductivity meter output. These errors can be ignored, which will produce results and errors typically found in high school or freshman-level laboratory work, or the buoyancy and volumetric errors can be measured and included in the calculations to produce results better than 0.1% in accuracy and reproducibility.

 

Caliometry

The calorimetry laboratory provides students with three different calorimeters that allow them to measure various thermodynamic processes including heats of combustion, heats of solution, heats of reaction, the heat capacity, and the heat of fusion of ice. The calorimeters provided in the simulations are a classic “coffee cup” calorimeter, a dewar flask (a better version of a coffee cup), and a bomb calorimeter.

 

The calorimetric method used in each calorimeter is based on measuring the temperature change associated with the different thermodynamic processes. Students can choose from a wide selection of:

 

·        organic materials to measure the heats of combustion;

·        salts to measure the heats of solution;

·        acids, bases, oxidants, and reductants for heats of reaction;

·        metals and alloys for heat capacity measurements;

·        ice for a melting process.

 

Temperature versus time data can be graphed during the measurements and saved to the electronic lab book for later analysis. Systematic and random errors in the mass and volume measurements have been included in the simulation by introducing buoyancy errors in the mass weighings, volumetric errors in the glassware, and characteristic systematic and random errors in the thermometer measurements.

 

For a full list of the activities related to the General Chemistry version, click here.

 

Organic v2.5                                      

The general features of the organic simulation include the ability to

 

·        synthesize products;

·        work up reaction mixtures and perform extractions;

·        use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC) as analytical tools;

·        purify products by distillation or recrystallization;

·        perform qualitative analysis experiments on unknowns using functional group tests with actual video depicting the results of the tests.

 

The simulation allows for more than 2,500,000 outcomes for synthesis experiments and can assign over 300 different qualitative analysis unknowns.

 

Many of the assignments involve performing synthesis experiments where the student is expected to choose the correct starting materials, reaction conditions, and reagent for the assigned product. After the reaction is started, the student is then expected to perform Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) experiments to determine when the reaction is complete. The student is then expected to wash or work up the reaction with the appropriate aqueous reagent and to analyze the product or products using IR and NMR spectroscopy. The cumulative effect of these assignments is to test the student’s knowledge of the reaction mechanism and appropriate reaction conditions, give the student experience in working up reaction mixtures, and provide practice for interpreting IR and NMR spectra. 

 

For a full list of the activities related to the Organic version, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Q: Can I get a tour of the Virtual ChemLab?

 

In-Depth Analysis of ChemLab Airs on PBS Teaching NOW!

Virtual ChemLab was recently evaluated and critiqued by a group of education experts while it was used in a high school AP chemistry class. This 30-minute program provides valuable examples of how to use ChemLab in a classroom and laboratory setting and also provides a powerful critical analysis of the effectiveness of the simulations to develop critical thinking skills. To see the full Virtual ChemLab segment on Teaching NOW!, click here. You will need the latest version of Real Player or Windows Media Player in order to view the program.

 

 

Virtual ChemLab Web Site

Visit the Virtual ChemLab Web Site for access to new worksheets, workbooks in electronic format, ChemLab news items, and research papers. A support forum is also available as well as solutions to common problems.

 

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Q: How does the student version differ from the instructor (site license) version?

 

Student version:                                            

Individual copies of Virtual ChemLab can be packaged with Prentice Hall textbooks or purchased by students and installed on personal computers. In the student version, an electronic workbook is provided at the beginning of the simulation that allows students to select experiments that correspond to laboratory assignments in the accompanying workbook. Students can also enter the laboratory, bypassing the preset experiments, to explore in the laboratory on their own or to perform custom experiments designed by the instructors.

 

This version of the software, when initially installed, is configured to have the full functionality of the various simulations, but it cannot receive nor submit electronic assignments. This version is the most simple to install and use and requires almost no oversight by the instructor. Since this version cannot receive nor submit electronic assignments, assignments are expected to be given using worksheets. This version, however, can be enabled to use the Web Connectivity Option for transferring electronic assignments.

 

Instructor (or Site License) version:

The only real differences between a student and an instructor (site license) version are:

 

1.      a site license version allows instructors to install the software on as many institutionally owned computers as needed;

2.      the site license CD provides several installation options that allow the software to be used in various configurations;

3.      the site license also includes Instructor Utilities, which allows instructors to give assignments and receive student work electronically.

 

Although the Virtual ChemLab simulations can be used as an exploratory activity or tool for students, the true power of the simulations is realized when students enter the virtual laboratory and perform assignments or experiments given to them by the instructor just as they would do in an actual laboratory setting. Because these laboratories are virtual, a wide variety of experiences can be provided ranging from very basic and guided to very complex and open-ended. It is up to the instructor to decide the best use of the laboratories whether it be as a pre-lab, a lab replacement, a homework or quiz assignment, a lab supplement, or a lecture discussion activity.

 

Because each instructor will have a different comfort level using software in the classroom or laboratory and will have different levels of technical support available, several different methods of implementing the simulations at an institution have been provided. Brief descriptions of these are listed below.

 

*** Any use of electronic assignments requires the installation and use of Virtual ChemLab Instructor Utilities. ***

 

Individual Student Versions

 

This is equivalent to installing a single user student version.

 

This implementation is provided for instructors who want to use printed worksheets in the accompanying workbooks for assignments.

 

 

 

 

 

SITE LICENSE SET-UP OPTIONS                

 

Direct Access Computer Lab (A Network Version)

 

In this implementation, a centralized database is installed on a network drive accessible to all client computers in the local area network, and the Virtual ChemLab software is installed on any client computers needing access to the simulations.

 

This installation is called a direct access installation since the client software accesses the database containing the class lists, assignments, lab books, and scores directly using a mapped or named network drive.

 

·        This version allows instructors to give assignments and receive results electronically.

 

·        This is a simple installation for computer labs and allows multiple instructors to use the software, but there are some network security issues associated with this type of installation.

 

·        The electronic workbook is not available in this installation.

 

 


 

 

 

 

Web Access Computer Lab (A Network Version)

 

This implementation is very similar to the direct access installation described above except in this instance, the assignment and lab book data is passed indirectly to the database using a servlet engine running on a TomCat web server.

 

This installation does not require a local area network but, instead, only requires a simple connection to the internet. This installation also corrects several security issues associated with a direct access connection.

 

Details on setting up and using the web connectivity feature is given in the Instructor Utilities user guide from the management perspective and in the various simulation user guides from the student perspective.

 

·        It is strongly suggested the user guides be reviewed before trying to implement this version. Most questions and problems can be avoided if the user guides are studied carefully.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Web Access Student Version

 

The student version of Virtual ChemLab described above can be activated to a full web version« when students are provided with a user name, password, and the URL address for the servlet engine.

 

After the web functionality is activated, the software is no longer configured with the electronic workbook and access to the laboratories is gained solely through the General Chemistry door or card reader.

 

This option allows students to install individual copies of the simulations on their personal computers and then perform their assignments and submit their results electronically over the web.

 

This option has all the advantages of the Web Access Computer Lab installation but relieves the instructor from having to maintain the software on institution computers.

 

 In all respects, this installation is identical to the workbook (student (single user)) version, except the workbook will not be available.

 

 

 

 

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Q: How do the stand-alone and text-specific versions differ?

 

All versions of Virtual ChemLab come with the full functionality of the simulations and with a workbook containing assorted laboratory and classroom assignments. The workbook in the stand-alone version has been organized by topic, and the assignments can be used with any general chemistry textbook. The text-specific workbooks have been organized to follow the topic order of their respective textbook. Given below are more detailed descriptions of the text-specific workbooks.

 

Chemistry: The Central Science, 10e

(Brown/LeMay/Bursten)

 

This version of Virtual ChemLab is intended to be used in conjunction with Chemistry, The Central Science 10th Edition by Brown, LeMay, and Bursten. An eLaboratory section has been added to the end of most chapters in the 10th Edition of the textbook, which contains problems and laboratory assignments that make use of the sophisticated laboratory simulations in Virtual ChemLab. The text-specific workbook contains the nearly 80 assignment worksheets that correspond to the brief problem descriptions in the eLaboratory sections. Many of these eLaboratory problems are similar to regular problems found in the text but require the student to measure the data in the virtual laboratory instead of having it provided for them.

 

 

General Chemistry, 9e

(Petrucci/Harwood/Herring/Madura)

 

This version of Virtual ChemLab is intended to be used in conjunction with General Chemistry: Principles and Modern Applications 9th Edition by Petrucci, Harwood, Herring, and Madura. An eLaboratory section has been added to the end of most chapters in the 9th Edition of the textbook, which contains problems and laboratory assignments that make use of the sophisticated laboratory simulations in Virtual ChemLab. The text-specific workbook contains the over 80 assignment worksheets that correspond to the brief problem descriptions in the eLaboratory sections. Many of these eLaboratory problems are similar to regular problems found in the text but require the student to measure the data in the virtual laboratory instead of having it provided for them.

 

Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry, 5e

(McMurry/Castellion/Ballantine)

This version of Virtual ChemLab is intended to be used in conjunction with Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry 5th Edition by McMurry, Castellion, and Ballantine. This workbook contains the nearly 50 assignment worksheets that correspond to problems and experiments discussed in the general chemistry section of the text. Many of these laboratory assignments are similar to regular problems found in the text but require the student to measure the data in the virtual laboratory instead of having it provided for them.

Also, please see: How do I get Virtual ChemLab and how much does it cost?

 

 

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Q: What supplements are available for Virtual ChemLab?

 

Students

All single user or student versions of Virtual ChemLab come with a workbook containing laboratory or classroom assignments at a level appropriate with the product.

 

Instructors

Solutions manuals for the text-specific workbooks are also available, and when purchasing a site license version a solutions manual for the stand-alone workbook is also included.

 

For ordering information, please see: How do I get Virtual ChemLab?

 

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Q: Who created Virtual ChemLab?

 

Brian Woodfield is the project director for the Virtual ChemLab project, a set of sophisticated and realistic simulations for high school, freshman, and sophomore level chemistry classes. This project has been funded by the Department of Education through the Fund for the Improvement for Post Secondary Education.

 

The conceptual basis for these instructional laboratory simulations is that it is almost impossible to teach laboratory technique on a computer. Instead, the most powerful use of the computer in the instructional laboratory is to provide a virtual environment where students are free to make the decisions they would confront in an actual laboratory setting and experience the resulting consequences.

 

This virtual environment, then, is the most effective means for students to apply the concepts and skills learned in the classroom. The current set of completed simulations include:

 

 

Virtual ChemLab is currently sold through Prentice Hall at the high school level as an integral part of the high school chemistry program, at the freshman and sophomore level as a standalone product, and Virtual ChemLab is packaged with three of the top selling freshman-level general chemistry texts.

 

Currently, over 150,000 students per year use Virtual ChemLab for homework, quizzes, and laboratory work. Brian is currently developing several new virtual physics laboratories that will be used for middle school, high school, and college level physics and physical science curriculums.

 

_____________________

 

Brian F. Woodfield graduated in 1986 with a B.S. degree in Chemistry from Brigham Young University. He also received a M.S. degree in Chemistry from Brigham Young University in 1988 where he worked with Juliana Boerio-Goates to construct a low-temperature adiabatic calorimeter to study the thermodynamics and phase transitions of solids. He later attended the University of California, Berkeley where he worked for Norman Phillips and received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry in 1995.

 

His doctoral work included the design and construction of a low-temperature specific heat apparatus for use in magnetic fields up to 9 T and in the temperature range of 0.5 K to 100 K. The apparatus was primarily used to study high-temperature superconductors. After Berkeley, Brian received a National Research Council Fellowship to pursue post-doctoral work at the Naval Research Laboratory. His post-doctoral worked included the design and construction of another low-temperature calorimeter with a temperature range of 0.5 K to 120 K which was later used to study colossal magnetoresistance phenomena.

 

After a one year teaching position at Southern Virginia College, Brian received an appointment at Brigham Young University in 1997 as an Assistant Professor and was later promoted to Associate Professor in 2002. Current research interests include the low-temperature physics of superconductors and magnetic materials and the thermodynamics of nanoscale materials. Brian currently has funding from the Department of Energy totaling over $700,000 to study the energetics of nanomaterials.

 

Brian has 80 publications to date, mostly in solid-state physics and thermodynamics, and has given over 100 presentations throughout the U.S., Canada, Japan, and Europe. Brian is in the process of starting up a company to make a wide variety of nanomaterials that takes advantage of a recent discovery in his laboratory.

 

Brian is married to Julie Stoker and they are the parents of four children: Rachel (19), Kellie (16), Travis (10) and Abigail (7).

 

 

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Q: How do I know if Virtual ChemLab is the right choice for me?

 

Virtual ChemLab is an open-ended laboratory simulation environment where students can perform a nearly unlimited number of experiments. Because of this, Virtual ChemLab is not pedagogically limiting; that is, the simulations can conform to whatever approach the instructor wishes to take.

 

Virtual ChemLab has been successfully used for homework, quizzes, take home exams, laboratory exams, pre-lab work, lab replacements, laboratory augmentation, on line schools, make-up labs, and classroom demonstrations.

 

If you are looking for a virtual laboratory environment where students and instructors are unconstrained, where the outcomes are real and sophisticated, where students can explore, discover, learn, think, and make connections, then Virtual ChemLab is the correct simulation package for you.

 

Check out what instructors are saying about it on the Virtual ChemLab Web Site!

 

 

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Q: What will students like about Virtual ChemLab?

 

Students will enjoy the:

 

·        The realistic environment

·        The easy-to-use interface

·        The sense of discovery

·        How the simulated laboratory brings the abstract learning of the classroom to life

 

Typically, it takes students on average 15 to 20 minutes to learn the interface and to be comfortable navigating the laboratory. Students almost uniformly respond favorably to using the simulations, even when the assignments are challenging and require problem solving skills that are new to them.

 

“Students have given Virtual Chem Lab the highest endorsement ... they are voluntarily purchasing it and recommending its use for future General Chemistry students.”

 

- Dr. Ron Rusay, Department of Chemistry, Diablo Valley College

 

 

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Q: What will instructors like about Virtual ChemLab?

 

Instructors will like Virtual ChemLab because it:

 

 

One of the key features of the Virtual ChemLab simulations is the ability to give assignments to students using either worksheets out of an accompanying workbook or electronically. Although worksheets are a convenient method to give assignments to students, electronic assignments offer the largest variety of activities and the most control over them.

 

The purpose of the Instructor Utilities component of Virtual ChemLab is to allow instructors to:

 

 

The ability to give assignments and retrieve results is only available when students run the software in an electronic access mode, either in a computer laboratory or in distributed environments over the web. (please see: How does the student version differ from the instructor (site license) version?)

 

Check out what instructors are saying about it on the Virtual ChemLab Web Site!

 

 

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Q: How do I get Virtual ChemLab and how much does it cost?

 

Ask your Prentice Hall Sales Rep about

Valuepacking Virtual ChemLab with your textbook!

 

General Chemistry, Version 2.5

 

   

 

 

 

STUDENT

·        Student Lab Manual / Workbook standalone

0131857509

·        Student Lab Manual / Workbook and CD Combo Package

0132280094

 

 

 

 

INSTRUCTOR

·        Instructor Lab Manual / Workbook standalone

0131734687

·        Instructor Lab Manual / Workbook and Student CD Combo Package

0132280108

·        Instructor Site License CD

0131857495

 

 

General Chemistry (Text-Specific)

 

 

 

 

View Larger Cover Image

Chemistry: The Central Science, 10e

(Brown/LeMay/Bursten)

 

STUDENT MediaPak

013134451X

 

INSTRUCTOR MediaPak

0132210193

 

 

 

View Larger Cover Image

General Chemistry, 9e

(Petrucci/Harwood/Herring/Madura)

 

STUDENT MediaPak

0132286955

 

INSTRUCTOR MediaPak

0132286874

 

 

 

View Larger Cover Image

Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry, 5e

(McMurry/Castellion/Ballantine)

 

STUDENT MediaPak

0132210916

 

INSTRUCTOR MediaPak

0132242788

 

 

 

 

 

 

Organic Chemistry, Version 2.5

 

 

 

 

 

STUDENT

·        Student Lab Manual / Workbook and CD Combo Package

0132388278

 

 

 

 

INSTRUCTOR

·        Instructor Lab Manual / Workbook standalone

0132294842

·        Instructor Site License CD

0132329263

 

  

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Q: Is Virtual ChemLab available as a web-based product?

 

In the traditional sense, Virtual ChemLab is not a web-based product. The simulations are too large to deliver over the web through a traditional web browser, thus the actual simulations must always be installed on every computer where they will be used.

 

However, Virtual ChemLab does provide the capability for instructors to give electronic assignments to students and to have students submit their results, observations, and answers back to the instructor through a web based servlet engine.

 

Consequently, students can use the simulations at home in a distributed environment for homework, quizzes, and online laboratory work.

 

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Q: Are there access codes to register for Virtual ChemLab?

 

No access code is needed to run the software.

 

Each copy of Virtual ChemLab must be installed on the local computer in order to run.

 

Virtual ChemLab is not accessed through a web site. However, it should be noted that a username and password will be required when using electronic assignments, but these will be assigned by the instructor.

 

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Q: With which textbooks is Virtual ChemLab packaged?

 

Customized versions of the Virtual ChemLab Workbook / Lab Manual (and accompanying CD)  were created to be used in conjunction with:

 

·        Chemistry: The Central Science, 10e (Brown/LeMay/Bursten)

 

·        General Chemistry: Principles with Modern Applications, 9e (Petrucci/Harwood/Herring/Madura)

 

·        Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry, 5e (McMurry/Castellion/Ballantine)

 

Also, please see:

How do the stand-alone and text-specific versions differ?

How do I get Virtual ChemLab and how much does it cost?

 

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Q: Is student data protected within Virtual ChemLab?

 

Yes, all class, student, and assignment data is stored as 64-bit encrypted text files. Access to this data is only allowed through the Instructor version of Virtual ChemLab, which is username and password protected.

 

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Q: How do I use the Virtual ChemLab in the classroom?

 

The laboratory simulations can be used:

 

 

The experimental results and outcomes for each lab are based on extensive experimentally determined databases and models.

 

Visit the Virtual ChemLab Web Site to see how other instructors use the simulations.

 

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Q: Are the Virtual ChemLab activities associated with an electronic Gradebook?

 

The ability to create and manage classes, add and delete students, define and give assignments, and grade lab books is included in the Instructor Utilities option in Virtual ChemLab which is included in the site license version of the software.

 

These typical grade book functions must be built into Virtual ChemLab because of the unique set of assignments and unknowns that must be given. However, tab delimited text files can be used to import students and export grades into and out of other standard grade book programs.

 

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Q: How do I install Virtual ChemLab?

 

A simple, straightforward installer with detailed installation instructions is included on each Virtual ChemLab CD.

 

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Q: What are the system requirements for Virtual ChemLab?

 

System Requirements

Minimum system requirements are as follows:

 

PC

-         Pentium 500 MHz (Pentium II or better recommended)

-         256 Mb RAM (512+ Mb Recommended)

-         CD-ROM drive (for installation only)

-         600 Mb of free disk space

-         Display capable of and set to millions of colors (24 bit color)

-         Minimum resolution 800 x 600 (1024 x 768 or higher strongly recommended)

-         Windows 2000 Professional or Windows XP

-         QuickTime 5.x/6.x/7.x

 

Macintosh

-         PowerPC (G3 or better recommended)

-         256 Mb RAM (512+ Mb recommended)

-         CD-ROM drive (for installation only)

-         600 Mb of free disk space

-         Display capable of and set to millions of colors (24-bit color)

-         Recommended minimum resolution 832 x 624 (1024 x 768 or higher strongly recommended)

-         OS X (any version)

-         QuickTime 5.x/6.x/7.x

 

Server (network installations)

For a Direct Database Access network installation or common database sharing among instructors, a file server running an operating system capable of mapped or named drives accessible to all clients in the local area network is required. The clients must be running an operating system compatible with the Virtual ChemLab software (see above). Linux, OS X, Windows, and Novell file servers have all been successfully implemented to host the Virtual ChemLab database.

 

Note: The above requirements are the recommended minimum hardware and system software requirements for reasonable execution speeds and reliability. However, it should be noted that the software has been successfully installed and used on computers with significantly lower capabilities than the recommendations given above with corresponding reductions in execution speed and media access time. 

 

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Q: What’s new in the v2.5 versions?

 

The following features have been added to version 2.5 of both the General and Organic chemistry products:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Q: Who do I contact for Tech Support issues?

 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT

 

If you are having problems with this software, call (800) 677-6337 Monday-Friday 8:00am - 8:00pm and Sunday 5:00pm-12:00am (All times listed are Eastern). You can also get support by filling out the web form located at http://247.prenhall.com/mediaform.

 

Our technical staff will need to know certain things about your system in order to help us solve your problems more quickly and efficiently. If possible, please be at your computer when you call for support. You should have the following information ready:

 

  1. Textbook ISBN
  2. CD-Rom/Diskette ISBN
  3. Corresponding product and title
  4. Computer make and model
  5. Operating System (Windows or Macintosh) and Version
  6. RAM available
  7. Hard disk space available
  8. Sound card?  Yes or No
  9. Printer make and model
  10. Network connection
  11. Detailed description of the problem, including the exact wording of any error messages.

 

NOTE: Pearson does not support and/or assist with the following:

 

  1. Third-party software (i.e. Microsoft including Microsoft Office Suite, Apple, Borland, QuickTime, etc.) Technical support for QuickTime related issues can be found at http://www.info.apple.com/usen/QuickTime/
  2. Homework assistance
  3. Textbooks and CD-Rom's purchased used are not supported and are non-replaceable. To purchase a new CD-Rom contact Pearson Individual Order Copies at 1-800-282-0693

 

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General Chemistry v2.5                  

 

Atomic Theory

Thomson Cathode Ray Tube Experiment

Millikan Oil Drop Experiment

Rutherford’s Backscattering Experiment

Investigating the Properties of Alpha and Beta Particles

Blackbody Radiation

Photoelectric Effect

The Rydberg Equation

Atomic Emission Spectra

Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle

Emission Spectra for Sodium and Mercury

 

Reactions and Stoichiometry

Names and Formulas of Ionic Compounds

Writing Balanced Precipitation Reactions

Strong and Weak Electrolytes

Precipitation Reactions

Counting Atoms

Counting Molecules

Counting Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons

Creating a Solution of Known Molality

Converting Concentrations to Different Units

 

Thermodynamics

Endothermic vs. Exothermic

Enthalpy of Solution: NH4NO3

Specific Heat of Al

Specific Heat of Pb

Heat of Combustion: Chicken Fat

Heat of Combustion: Sugar

Heat of Combustion: TNT

Heat of Formation: Ethanol

Heat of Formation: Aspirin

Heat of Reaction: NaOH(aq) + HCl(aq)

Heat of Reaction: MgO(s) + HCl(aq)

Hess’s Law

The Balance Between Enthalpy and Entropy

 

Colligative Properties

Heat of Fusion of Water

Heat of Vaporization of Water

The Boiling Point of Water at High Altitude

Boiling Point Elevation

Freezing Point Depression

Molar Mass Determination by Boiling Point Elevation

Molar Mass Determination by Freezing Point Depression

Changes in the Boiling Point

 

Gas Properties

Boyle’s Law: Pressure and Volume

Charles’ Law: Temperature and Volume

Avogadro’s Law: Moles and Volume

Derivation of the Ideal Gas Law

Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures

Ideal vs. Real Gases

The Effect of Mass on Pressure

 

Acid-Base Chemistry

Acid-Base Classification of Salts

Ranking Salt Solutions by pH

Concepts in Acid-Base Titrations

Predicting the Equivalence Point

Ionization Constants of Weak Acids

Acid-Base Titration: Practice

Acid-Base Titration: Unknown HCl

Study of Acid-Base Titrations – Monoprotic Acids

Weak Acid-Strong Base Titrations

Strong Acid-Weak Base Titrations

Weak Acid-Weak Base Titrations

Study of Acid-Base Titrations – Polyprotic Acids

Acid-Base Standardization

Analysis of Baking Soda

 

Electrochemistry

Study of Oxidation-Reduction Titrations

Standardization of a Permanganate Solution

Analysis of a Ferrous Chloride Sample

 

Descriptive Chemistry

Flame Test for Metals

Identification of Cations in Solution – Flame Tests

Identification of Cations in Solution – Ag+, Hg2

Identification of Cations in Solution – Co2+, Cr3+, Cu2+

Identification of Cations in Solution – Ba2+, Sr2+, Ca2+, Mg2+

Identification of Cations in Solution – Co2+, Cu2+, Ni2+

 

Titrations

Inert Salts

Graphing Titration Data

Activities

Indicators

Buoyancy

Glassware Calibration

 

Gas Properties

Boyle’s Law: 1/Volume versus Pressure

Compressibility

Van der Waals Gases

 

Atomic Theory and Quantum Mechanics

Thomson

Rutherford Backscattering

Photoelectric Effect

de Broglie

HCl Gas Absorbance

I2 Gas Absorbance

Water Absorption

Raman Scattering

 

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Organic v2.5  

Introduction

Using Thin Layer Chromatography

 

Alkene Reactions

Alkene Halogenation

Alkene Hydration

Etherfication

Alkene Hydration

Alkene Halogenation

Halohydrin Formation

Epoxidation

Hydroboration

Alkene Bromination

Halohydrin Formation

 

Diene Reactions

Diene Halogenation

Etherfication

Diene Halogenation

Diels Alder

 

Substitution Elimination

Alkyl Halide Solvolysis

Nucleophilic Substitution

Williamson Ether Synthesis

Alkene Formation

Nucleophilic Substitution

Williamson Ether Synthesis

Amine Formation

 

Alcohol Reactions

Alcohol Halogenation

Alcohol Dehydration

 

Spectroscopy

Interpreting IR Spectra

Interpreting NMR Spectra

 

Qualitative Analysis

Qualitative Analysis – Alkenes

Qualitative Analysis – Alcohols

Qualitative Analysis – Aldehydes

Qualitative Analysis – Ketones

Qualitative Analysis – Acids

Qualitative Analysis – Esters

Qualitative Analysis – Amines

Qualitative Analysis – Amides

Qualitative Analysis – Halides

Qualitative Analysis – Ethers

Qualitative Analysis – General

 

Aromatic Substation

Benzene Nitration

Friedel-Crafts

 

Carboxylic Acids

Ether Formation

Amide Formation

Ester Hydrolysis

Transesterification

 

Carbonyl Additions

Grignard Addition

Carbonyl Reduction

Acetal Formation

 

Enols and Enolates

α-Halogenation

Aldol

Claisen Condensation

Dieckmann Reaction

 

Oxidation and Reduction

Alcohol Oxidation

Aldehyde Oxidation

Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation

Alkene Dihydroxylation

Quinone Reduction

Epoxidation

 

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